Wednesday, March 25, 2015

A Funny Easter Story

This little story begins many years ago
in the country outside of a small rural town.
There lived a family who worked a dairy.
In addition to the cows, 
there were chickens, rabbits, dogs
and a billy goat that was the pet of the little boy.
This was the typical rural family:
father, mother, daughter, and son.
(source)
One Easter Sunday,
there was another family,a city family, that came to visit 'the farm'
and have Easter dinner.
They were all looking forward to the day.
Upon arrival, the son of the city family
raced out of the car and asked to see the rabbits.
Son of the rural family obliged
and asked what the excitement was all about.
The other boy exclaimed earnestly,
"I want to see if the bunnies laid any Easter eggs."
The farm boy then called him stupid
and informed him that rabbits do not lay eggs.
There may have been a bit of a scuffle at this point.
The farm boy proceeded to get in trouble.
It rather put a damper on the excitement of the day.

That is just one of the stories my grandmother tells of my father.
Dad will still respond, "Stupid kid."
My dad is not a mean person, just factual.

Dad was one of those kids who kept life exciting.
There are many many more, but I thought this one was fitting
for the season.
It does awaken one to the marketing that the American industry adopts.
Why isn't it the Easter chicken if we are to use their eggs?
And, why not a cross rather than eggs & bunnies?
It's a bit perplexing if you ask me.
Regardless, the family story still brings a laugh.

Until next time,
Nimble Fingers and Even Stitches 



Sunday, March 22, 2015

Help Please

There is such a wealth of knowledge among blog readers.
I was wondering if you could help me out.
I love this draping flower/tree but don't know what it is.
(source)

There is a smaller light pink one by the door.
I can't imagine my yard ever being so immaculate,
but it doesn't hurt to dream a little.

Thank you in advance.

Until next time 
Nimble Fingers and Even Stitches

Thursday, March 19, 2015

Sweet Scent of Spring

The wild plums are beginning to blossom.
They certainly are a heavenly sight after winter greys.
The feathery petals are soft and pure.

At times, I think flower petals and butterfly wings
must be spun from the same fiber.

We have had an extremely mild and dry winter
which is worrisome in the way of water for summer.
There is little snow-pack in the mountains,
and we have had only a few rains.

The good news is that I began working the garden.
While last year at this time,
the ground was frozen solid.
I just got my potatoes in the ground and
am hoping to get radishes, carrots and beets in soon.
Our last freeze date is about the middle of June,
but I am following a little different advice this year.
You can read some of that in this garden post.

Our daffys aren't quite blooming yet,
but it will only be a matter of days.

I have some pretty ambitious yard and garden plans this year.
We'll see how much of it materializes.
I will keep you posted and hopefully have a mini tour coming soon.

Until next time,
Nimble Fingers and Even Stitches


Saturday, March 14, 2015

Candied Violets

Just a day or two ago,
after returning home in the dark,
I walked up to get the mail and instantly knew
the violets are blooming.
They smell heavenly.
Sure enough, the next morning I looked out at a good patch of them.
It's amazing to me how every year they seem
to surprise me by showing up virtually overnight.

They are always the first flowers to brave
the possible cold of spring.
Always a welcome site, I have used them in making 
a variety of  delicacies
including jelly, adding them to salad,
or candied violets.
That being said, I thought I would share the recipe.

Candied Violets

2 egg whites
1/2 cup sugar (I use fine but not super-fine)
6 dozen violets with stem but no leaves - washed

In a bowl, beat egg whites until frothy.
Place sugar in a shallow bowl.  Holding flower by stem, dip one at a time
into egg whites then in sugar covering all surfaces.
Place in a single layer on a waxed paper lined baking sheet.
Snip stems.  Using a toothpick, separate petals to return to their
original shape.  Sprinkle sugar on any uncoated areas.
Dry in a 200 degree oven for 30-40 minutes or until sugar crystallizes.
Carefully remove violets to wire racks with a small spatula.
Sprinkle again with sugar if violets appear syrupy.
Cool, then store in an airtight container separated by waxed paper.
(or just eat them at this point:)
Keeps up to 1 week. (in fridge)
They are beautiful on cakes, cupcakes, or as a garnish to chocolate deserts.

This is not an original recipe of mine.  It's been a part of my recipe box for about 100 years (I bust be about 112 years old by now:) 
 Credit goes to the mother of Bernie Bellin of Wisconsin.

Until next time,
Nimble Fingers and Even Stitches